BBS Course Description-General Education

Virginia Christian University / Academics  / Bachelor of Biblical Studies / BBS Course Description-General Education

CO 327. Introduction to Information Literacy (3 credits)
This course is designed to foster students’ ability to identify, search, evaluate, use, and present effectively the information relevant to decision making and problem solving in their studies, future professions, and daily lives. Therefore, the course focuses on the abilities of autonomous and life-long learning which is essential in today’s new era

CO 328. The Microsoft Office (3 credits)
Introductory lecture course with skill development which provides a comprehensive study of modern hardware and software.

CO 329. Operating System of Computer (3 credits)
This course presented as an introduction to the operating systems for computer majors. It is intended as an in-depth treatment of the components of the operate system and its various commands.

ED 218. Foundation of Education (3 credits)
This course designed to study the origins and development of educational thought. The historical context and the sociological dynamics of philosophical thought will be examined and evaluated in light of their impact on education today.

EN 212. English Writing Skills (3 credits)
The course will focus on basic English writing skills, will require several short writing assignments, and will provide grammatical and syntactical correction for all papers, sermons, and presentations required in regular seminary courses. Students placed into the course must register for it each semester until the course is passed and must pass the course in order to graduate.

EN 213A. English Composition (I) (3 credits)
The course will focus on basic English composition skills, will require several short composition assignments, and will provide grammatical and syntactical correction for all papers, sermons, and presentations required in regular class courses.

EN 213B. English Composition (II) (3 credits)
The course will focus on next English composition skills, will require several short composition assignments, and will provide grammatical and syntactical correction for all papers, sermons, and presentations required in regular class courses.

EN 214A. English Conversation (I) (3 credits)
The course will focus on basic English conversation skills, will require several short conversation, and will provide grammatical and syntactical correction for all papers, sermons, and presentations required in regular class courses for short conversation.

EN 214B. English Conversation (II) (3 credits)
The course will focus on next English conversation skills, will require several short conversation, and will provide grammatical and syntactical correction for all papers, sermons, and presentations required in regular class courses for short conversation.

HI 225. World Sects (3 credits)
In a seminar format students examine the lives, communities, and document of the Sects of World. Attention is given to the historical contexts in which World heresy took, found expression, and has influenced in seminar sessions as major cults of World : Seventh Day Advent, Jehavah’s witness and LDS Church.

HI 224(I). History Of United States- I (3 credits)
One of two related courses (with HI 225), which may be taken in either order. European exploration, settlement, and culture in the British North American colonies; movement for independence and constitutional government; foreign relations and foreign policy; efforts toward a more democratic and egalitarian society; social, cultural, and intellectual growth in the new republic; Western expansion and economic development; conflict over slavery and the nature of the union; the Civil War.
PREREQUISITES: EN 211 or EN213

HI 224(II). History Of United States- II. (3 credits)
One of two related courses (with HI 224), which may be taken in either order. Post-Civil War Reconstruction; the industrial revolution and rise of the city; the new immigration; the social, cultural, and political responses to these changes; the emergence of the United States as a more active world power. American society in the 1920s, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the controversies over the American role in world affairs; new developments in modern American society and culture.
PREREQUISITES: HI 224

HI 225A. World Civilizations (I) (3 credits)
A study of the development of civilization from the beginning of recorded history to the Reformation. Emphasis will be placed on the historical contributions from Egypt, Babylonia, China, India, Persia, Palestine, Greece, and Rome.

HI 225B. World Civilizations (II) (3 credits)
A study of the development of civilization from the Reformation to the Present day. Emphasis will be placed on the historical contributions from Europe, the U.S., the World Wars, and the fall of Communism.

MATH 110. Survey Of College Math.3 (3 credits)
Course Description: A general college mathematics course whose topics include linear equations, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability, Markov chains, and mathematics of finance. The applications are primarily from business, economics, and the life sciences. Emphasis is on developing, analyzing, and interpreting mathematical models.
PREREQUISITES: EN 211 or EN213.

PH 100. Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
An introductory study of major figures, conceptions, and methods of philosophy. Special attention will be given to the conception education of western and eastern philosophy history.

PH 102. Philosophy of Religion (3 credits)
This course designed to introduction to the philosophical study of the phenomena of religion. Methodology, Basic issue, as-language, reason and revelation: concepts of God and person: relation of religion to other areas of knowledge.

PH 103. History of Western Philosophy (I) (3 credits)
This course designed to survey of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy from pre-Socrates to the Renaissance.

PH 104. History of Western Philosophy (II) (3 credits)
This course designed to survey of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy from Decartes to Wittgenstein.

PH 105. Existentialism (III) (3 credits)
This course designed to survey of Modern Existentialism emphasizing the view of Kierkegaard, Nietzche, Dostoevski, Heidergger, Jaspers, Tillich, Marcel, Sartre, Buber, and Berdyaev.

PH 206. Logic (3 credits)
A study of the major divisions of traditional logic: Categorical (categorical syllogisms with proofs of validity), Truth-Functional(truth tables, rules of replacement and inference and formal proofs), and Informal (induction, scientific reasoning, informal fallacies).

PS 326. Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
A study of the major elements of psychology, including theories and applications. Topics will include human development, learning, perception, memory, personality, and behavior.

PS 327. Human Sexuality (3 credits)
A survey of the broad scope of human sexual development and expressions. Particular attention will be devoted to sexual development, sexual behavior over the life cycle, sexual variance, law, ethics, and cross-cultural perspectives. Sexual dysfunction and problems related to intimacy will also be considered.

SO 200. Introduction to Public Communication
This course will be cover basic principles of public communication in various situations and will be help student to practice to communicate in public .

SO 201. Survey of English Literature
This course designed to study classical literatures including representative works from antiquity to the twenty century. Classical literary works from both the England and America will be surveyed In the course including Christian Classics.

SO 220A. World Religion (I) (3 credits)
This course designed to study of the major religion of mankind. The origin, basic concepts, influence, and present status of each religion will be studied, and the religions will be compared and contracted with each other and with the Hebrew-Christian religions and Korean religions.

SO 220B. World Religion (II) (3 credits)
This course designed to study of the major religion of mankind. The origin, basic concepts, influence, and present status of each religion will be studied, and the religions will be compared and contracted with each other and with the Hebrew-Christian religions and Korean religions.

SO 221. Contemporary America Culture (3 credits)
This seminar course examines the interaction of America religion with its cultural context. Topics treated include the persistence of religion commitment in an increasingly secularized America, the “restructuring” of the contours of American religion since the middle of the 20 th century, the relationship of church and state, the relationship of religion and the media, and the issues arising from the relationship of religion and sexuality.

SO 223. Sociology (3 credits)
A study of theories, methods, and concepts of sociology, focusing on the critical issues of society. Topics will include poverty, inequality, aging, violence, sexuality, work, technology, and drug abuse.